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Who is Sandra Lindsay Wiki, Biography, Age, Career, Net Worth, Instagram, Facts You Need to Know

Sandra Lindsay Wiki – Sandra Lindsay Biography

The largest vaccination campaign in US history continues with an intensive care nurse in New York now becoming the first person to receive the COVID-19 vaccine this morning, with the death toll from the virus approaching 300,000.

 

Sandra Lindsay Pfizer took her footage live with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo just before 9.30am this morning at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens.

 

“It didn’t feel any different from getting another vaccine,” Lindsay said. I feel hopeful today, I am relieved. I feel healing is coming. I hope this is the beginning of the end of a very painful period in our history. I want to instill public confidence that the vaccine is safe. ‘

 

President Donald Trump tweeted a few minutes after receiving the intensive care nurse’s dose: ‘First Vaccine Has Been Done. Congratulations to the USA! Congratulations WORLD! ‘

 

Vaccines continued throughout the morning as healthcare professionals from Ohio to Louisiana rolled up their sleeves to get their vaccinations, as frozen vaccine bottles began to reach hospitals across the country.

 

Healthcare workers were the first to receive the vaccine to overcome the epidemic that claimed the lives of 299,163 Americans and infected more than 16.25 million people.

 

General Gustave Perna, responsible for the federal government’s Warp Speed ​​Operation, said vaccines will begin in nursing homes this week.

 

The first of the vaccines was administered in a day when the COVID-19 mortality rate was approaching the sad 300,000 milestone and cases and hospitalizations reached new record levels last week.

 

Health workers

 

Nursing home and long-term care facility residents

 

Basic non-health workers

 

Over 70s

 

Over 65 years old

 

Over 60s

 

Over 50 years old

 

People with chronic health problems

 

Young adults

 

Child

 

Workers at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center gave the first injections to applaud the countdown of ‘3-2-1.

 

Steven Lee, an intensive care unit pharmacist at Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans, summed up the moment he got his own vaccine: “Instead of treating it, we can finally prevent it.”

 

Other hospitals across the country, from Rhode Island to Texas, have emptied valuable frozen vaccine bottles with gradual deliveries throughout the day and until Tuesday.

 

The first 2.9 million doses began shipped from Pfizer’s manufacturing facility in Kalamazoo, Michigan, to distribution centers across the country on Sunday.

 

The pharmaceutical giant said the initial shipments would deliver millions of doses to 64 states, US territories and five federal agencies, as well as major cities.

 

The spread of the vaccine came as the US released another sad round of statistics, with new infections, hospitalizations, and continuing deaths.

 

The seven-day moving average of deaths is currently just over 2,400 per day. The death toll from just 300,000 rose to 1,389 yesterday.

 

It reached a record 109,331 yesterday, and new cases were 190,920.

 

In the face of the increase in all three measurements, health officials are fixing hopes of kneeling the virus with a vaccine.

 

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar called the present ‘historic’ and said he would monitor the vaccination of frontline healthcare workers in Washington DC.

 

I’m excited to see some frontline healthcare workers today as part of the George Washington Hospital vaccination plan and see them get vaccinated – some of the first people in the county, Azar, told NBC’s Today.

 

Azar predicted that Americans would go to their pharmacy by late February to get the COVID-19 vaccine, similar to how the flu vaccine was administered.

 

I think we can see this (general public vaccine) from late February until March. Indeed, again, it will depend on the governors of our country, but with the Moderna and the Pfizer vaccine, as I said, we will have up to 100 million gunshots by the end of February. ‘

 

The Trump administration is now rushing to launch the $ 250 million vaccination public education campaign – Developing Vaccine Trust – within the week of the first Americans receiving the first doses.

 

The public campaign, which includes a wave of advertising, will kick off across the country this week, targeting people who are hesitant to get the vaccine but can be persuaded, the New York Times reports.

It was delayed six weeks after health secretary Azar ordered an internal review following scrutiny from Democrats.

The initial campaign, which Democrats said was propaganda for Trump’s reelection, was supposed to feature celebrities like Dennis Quaid and Billy Ray Cyrus.

Mark Weber, the federal official who is behind the campaign, said it will now be a ‘science-based approach’.

‘This is exciting; the vaccines have been developed in record time,’ he said. ‘But we have to be careful not to generate demand before they are available to the broader public.’

Weber, who has a marketing degree, said the campaign was battling a ‘credibility factor right now’.

Dr Anthony Fauci also acknowledged the challenges given the divisiveness currently within the US.

‘When you have an anti-science element together with a divisiveness in the country, it will be challenging,’ he said. ‘But you know, we’ve done challenging things before.’

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla admitted this morning that he was initially skeptical the drugmaker could even produce the vaccine at such historic speeds.

‘I was hoping, I was aspiring and I was driving everything so we could do it. But deep inside me I thought it was a very stretch goal and there is a small possibility to make it but we made it,’ he told CNBC’s Squawk Box.

The Trump administration is now rushing to roll out its $250 million vaccination public education campaign – Building Vaccine Confidence – in the same week that the first Americans received initial doses.

The public campaign, which includes a wave of advertisements, will begin this week across t
he country and is targeting those who are hesitant to take the vaccine but could be persuaded to, the New York Times reports.

It was delayed six weeks after health secretary Alex Azar ordered an internal review following scrutiny from Democrats.

The initial campaign, which Democrats said was propaganda for Trump’s reelection, was supposed to feature celebrities like Dennis Quaid and Billy Ray Cyrus.

Mark Weber, the federal official behind the campaign, said it will now be a ‘science-based approach’.

‘This is exciting; the vaccines have been developed in record time,’ he said. ‘But we have to be careful not to generate demand before they are available to the broader public.’

A wary public will be watching closely to see whether health workers embrace vaccination. Just half of Americans say they want to get vaccinated, while about a quarter don’t and the rest are unsure, according to a recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Health Research.

Weber, who has a marketing degree, said the campaign was battling a ‘credibility factor right now’.

Dr Anthony Fauci also acknowledged the challenges given the divisiveness currently within the US.

‘When you have an anti-science element together with a divisiveness in the country, it will be challenging,’ he said.

‘But you know, we’ve done challenging things before.’

President Trump was quick to tweet news of the first vaccination on Monday and praised the initial distribution efforts a day earlier.

He tweeted late Sunday night that White House staffers should not receive first access to the COVID-19 vaccine ‘unless specifically necessary’ following a report that those who work close to the president would be inoculated this week ahead of the general public.

‘People working in the White House should receive the vaccine somewhat later in the program, unless specifically necessary. I have asked that this adjustment be made,’ Trump tweete.

‘I am not scheduled to take the vaccine, but look forward to doing so at the appropriate time. Thank you!’

Packed in dry ice to stay at ultra-frozen temperatures, the first of nearly 3 million doses being shipped in staggered batches this week made their way by truck and by plane around the country yesterday from Pfizer’s Kalamazoo, Michigan facility.

Workers clapped and whistled as the first boxes were loaded onto trucks at the Pfizer factory on Sunday.

The vials were then transported to UPS and FedEx planes waiting at air fields in Lansing and Grand Rapids.

The jets delivered the shipments to UPS and FedEx cargo hubs in Louisville and Memphis from where they were loaded onto planes and trucks to be distributed to the first 145 of 636 vaccine-staging areas across the country.

The vials started arriving at select hospitals this morning.

Hospitals in Texas, Utah and Minnesota said they will administer the first shots as soon as they receive their shipment doses.

Trump had praised the initial distribution efforts in a tweet on Sunday, saying: ‘Vaccines are shipped and on their way, FIVE YEARS AHEAD OF SCHEDULE. Get well USA. Get well WORLD. We love you all!’

Later in the night, Trump tweeted that White House staffers should not receive first access to the COVID-19 vaccine ‘unless specifically necessary’ following a report that those who work close to the president would be inoculated as soon as this week ahead of the general public.

‘People working in the White House should receive the vaccine somewhat later in the program, unless specifically necessary. I have asked that this adjustment be made,’ Trump wrote.

‘I am not scheduled to take the vaccine, but look forward to doing so at the appropriate time. Thank you!’

Sunday’s shipments of the vaccine set into motion the biggest vaccination effort in American history at a critical juncture of the pandemic that has killed more than 1.6 million and sickened more than 71.1 million worldwide.

Now, the hurdle is to rapidly get the vaccine into the arms of millions, not just doctors and nurses but other at-risk health workers such as janitors and food handlers – and then deliver a second dose three weeks later.

‘This is the most difficult vaccine rollout in history. There will be hiccups undoubtedly but we’ve done everything from a federal level and working with partners to make it go as smoothly as possible. Please be patient with us,’ Surgeon General Jerome Adams told Fox News.

A wary public will be watching closely to see whether health workers embrace vaccination.

Just half of Americans say they want to get vaccinated, while about a quarter don’t and the rest are unsure, according to a recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Health Research.

The vaccine, co-developed by German partner BioNTech, is being doled out based on each state’s adult population.

It is up to states to decide who gets vaccinated first, but the CDC has recommended injecting health care workers and nursing home residents who also have first priority.

Pennsylvania health care giant UPMC has chosen staff who are critical to operating its facilities as among those getting the first round of vaccinations, said Dr Graham Snyder, who led the center’s vaccine task force.

‘It’s very exciting. I will be thrilled, that moment when we administer our first dose,’ Snyder said Saturday. ‘That will clearly be a watershed moment for us.’

Snyder said the UPMC system estimates that half its employees are willing to get the vaccine as soon as it’s offered to them.

A critical care nurse who has treated COVID-19 patients in New York City tirelessly for nearly 10 months became the first person in the US to receive the vaccine Monday as part of a campaign to immunize front-line health care workers.

Sandra Lindsay, a nurse and the director of patient services in the intensive care unit at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, received the shot at the Queens facility shortly before 9.30am this morning.

‘It didn’t feel any different from taking any other vaccine,’ Lindsay said immediately after. ‘I feel hopeful today, relieved. I feel like healing is coming. I hope this marks the beginning of the end of a very painful time in our history. I want to instill public confidence that the vaccine is safe.’

Lindsay, who has more than 26 years of experience as a medical professional, was born and raised in Jamaica West Indies. She immigrated to the US in 1986 to further her education in nursing.

The 52-year-old first obtained her Bachelors of Science degree in nursing from St. Joseph’s College, in Brooklyn, before going on to get her Master’s in the field from the Bronx’s Herbert Lehman College.

Lindsay first began working as a student nurse at the famed Lenox Hill Hospital, located on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, in 1994. In 2011 she was selected as a ‘top talent’ as part of North Shore Health’s High Potential Employee program.  She later became a nurse manager at the hospital.

Her brother, Garfield Lindsay, beamed with pride on social media that his ‘champ’ of a younger sister was the first American to receive the jab.

‘So proud of my younger sis for stepping up and taking the COVID-19 vaccine like a champ,’ Garfield Lindsay posted on Monday morning. ‘She has witnessed firsthand too many deaths and is leading by example by doing what’s necessary to beat this virus. First in the US, I think, so so proud.’

Dr Yves Duroseau, who is head of emergency at the same hospital, was second in line for his shot. Duroseau, who lost an uncle to COVID during the pandemic, urged Americans not to fear the vaccine.

‘I’m very thankful for this moment,’ he said. ‘This is a hopef
ul day. I saw a lot of devastation. I saw it personally in my family. It is very important to not fear the vaccination. We cannot continue to have 3,000 people die a day.’

Another vaccine by Moderna will be reviewed by an expert panel on Thursday and soon afterward could be allowed for public use.

America’s latest surge in infections is expected to worsen through the holiday season – putting even more strain on hospitals that are already overwhelmed.

As of Sunday 48 states were reporting hospitalization rates exceeding 100 per one million residents, according to the COVID Tracking Project, which released new graphs showing the dramatic increase in the percentage of ICU beds occupied by coronavirus patients in the last week of November compared to the last week in August.

The organization said half of the 10 Hospital Referral Regions (HHRs) with the most drastic increases in patient occupancy were in the Southwest.

‘Three of these regions are in Texas bordering New Mexico: Amarillo (an increase of 70.9 percentage points), El Paso (an increase of 53.8 percentage points), and Lubbock (an increase of 47.7 percentage points),’ it said in a tweet Saturday.

‘In contrast, only one HRR on the entire East Coast was represented in the top ten: Providence, Rhode Island, with an increase of 51.2 percentage points during this timeframe,’ it added.

In the last week, the total number of cases and deaths were at record highs. Nearly 1.5 million new cases were confirmed and 16,800 deaths, according to John Hopkins data.

Rhode Island is currently the worst affected state across the country with an average of 117 cases per 100,000 people in the last week, CDC data shows.

Ohio follows with 105 cases per 100,000, Tennessee with 96 cases and then Indiana with 95 cases.

In terms of deaths, the Midwest continues to be the worst affected.

North Dakota currently has the most deaths with 2.6 deaths for every 100,000 people.

Iowa and South Dakota follow with 2.5 deaths each per capita and then Wyoming with 1.6 deaths.

The spike in cases continues to worsen in California, in particular, which reported 35,729 new cases on Saturday – a new daily record for any state in the US.

California, the most populous state in the country with 31.5 million residents, now has more people hospitalized than any state at any time since New York in April.

Gov Gavin Newson imposed a new stay-at-home order for regions of the state with less than 15 percent available ICU capacity earlier this month.

Three of the five regions – comprising over 77 percent of the population – have met that threshold.

US employers can legally require their workers to get vaccinated for COVID-19, but it is likely most will choose to make the shot optional instead, employment lawyers say.

Businesses have been weighing up whether to implement a mandatory vaccination policy among staff as the release of a coronavirus vaccine to the general public looms.

The fast-tracked development of the shot is a long-awaited breakthrough amid the ongoing pandemic but has also sparked debate over how safe it actually is and if it should be compulsory in the workplace.

Employers generally have legal authority to require staff to get vaccinated against the virus, though there are some exceptions.

And conversely, workers have the right to object to mandatory vaccinations under anti-discrimination laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which allows employees to be exempt if it goes against a ‘sincerely held religious belief’.

Likewise, those with medical disabilities can request an exemption under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

But like all legal frameworks, there are exceptions and variations depending on the case and jurisdiction, meaning imposing a mandatory policy can present a difficult and time-consuming legal challenge for employers.

Legal experts therefore believe employers will most likely stray away from such programs, which would also make them liable if an employee suffers an adverse reaction.

Leading labor and employment law firm Ogletree Deakins, which recently formed an advice ‘task force’ due to an influx of queries from employers, says companies should consider the ‘politicized nature’ of the virus and expect objections if they choose to make the vaccine mandatory.

‘If large numbers of people feel the need to be exempt from wearing a mask (which is significantly less intrusive than receiving a vaccination), then employers likely can expect an equal or greater objection to a new vaccine,’ attorneys James Paul, Bret Daniel and Jimmy Robinson said.

The law firm said it will also be difficult to predict how rules surrounding required vaccinations will translate in the pandemic era.

Current case law applies to those in the healthcare industry which is considered a high-risk work setting, therefore other employers outside that sector may have a harder time fighting for those policies in court, according to the firm.

However, the severity and novelty of the coronavirus has also prompted exceptions by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The EEOC earlier this year designated it as a ‘direct threat’ meaning an infected person poses or a ‘significant risk of substantial harm’ to others.

The updated standard allows ‘more extensive medical inquiries and controls in the workplace than typically allowed under the ADA.’

A direct threat ‘permits employers to implement medical testing and other screening measures the ADA would usually prohibit.’

Despite this, the law firm noted the EEOC has been ‘traditionally hostile’ to mandatory vaccination programs.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) however, is more likely ‘to defer’ to such policies, legal experts said.

However OSHA is neither without its exemptions to the rule.

During the H1N1 influenza in 2009, the agency said an employee could be entitled to whistleblower rights if they refuse vaccination due to a ‘reasonable belief that he or she has a medical condition that creates a real danger of serious illness or death’.

With all the uncertainty surrounding the vaccine, legal experts advise employers to stay across new guidance that will likely be issued by federal and state authorities once the vaccine is approved.

‘Imposition of a mandatory COVID-19 vaccine will almost certainly result in a slew of accommodation requests – medical, religious, personal, and ethical—fueled by mistrust of political leaders and the healthcare industry,’ Olgetree Deakins said.

‘A mandatory vaccination policy may or may not be right for one’s workplace, but as employers explore their options they may want to proceed with caution’.

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