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Matt Stutzman Biography

The Armless archer: Matt Stutzman Biography, Wiki, Age, Family, Net Worth, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Fast Facts You Need to Know

Matt Stutzman Biography, Wiki

Matt Stutzman is an American archer. He competed in the 2012 and 2016 Paralympics and won a silver medal in 2012. He holds a world record for the longest accurate shot in archery.

Stutzman was born in Kansas City, Kansas, and currently lives in Fairfield, Iowa. Born without arms, he had to learn to do everything one might normally do with one’s arms, but with his feet. Stutzman is married and has two sons, Carter and Cameron. He appears in the 2013 documentary film My Way to Olympia.

Best WA world ranking position: 1st place (on 30 October 2013).

Matt Stutzman is from Fairfield, Iowa is a top-ranked archer in the country. “The last time we looked into it, 1% of archers in the world make a living shooting a bow,” he said.

Matt Stutzman Short Bio

BornDecember 10, 1982 (age 36 years), Kansas City, Kansas, United States
MoviesMy Way to Olympia
ChildrenAlex Stutzman, Carter Stutzman, Cameron Stutzman
ParentsJean Stutzman, Leon Stutzman

Matt Stutzman Age

He is 36 years old.

Who is The Armless archer Matt Stutzman

He’s not bragging – he is really just that good and has the accolades to prove it. “January of 2010 is when I decided to be the best archer in the world. And by 2011, I had already made the U.S. Team, and by 2012, I went to my first Games, and won a Silver!”

And he did it all with his feet.

Yes – one of the most celebrated archers in the world was born without arms.

His competitors have learned to fear him – not only those at the Paralympic Games in London, where he won his silver medal, but also able-bodied archers that he’s bested time and time again.

Stutzman basically had to figure it out. So, just how does he do it?

His only adaptation is a strap around his chest, which he uses to pull back the bow string, as he demonstrated for correspondent Lee Cowan.

“And at this point I’m adjusting my strap to make sure it’s in the same place,” he said. “That way when I draw back, I push my leg away from my chest. I bring my right shoulder up and I set it. Bring my face down to my release … and then I shoot.

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