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Who is Mark Anthony Aguirre Wiki, Bio, Age, Net Worth, Instagram, Twitter & More Facts

Mark Anthony Aguirre Wiki – Mark Anthony Aguirre Biography

A former Houston Police Department Captain accused of firing a gun on a mechanic over false voting allegations, was one of 20 investigators previously hired to overturn the election by the controversial GOP megawatt, Steven Hotze, who wanted the shooting of George Floyd protesters.

 

Mark Anthony Aguirre, 63, was charged with a heavy assault with a deadly weapon on Tuesday, almost two months after pointing the firearm at an air conditioner technician he believed was involved in the vote fraud operation.

 

It happened when prosecutors followed the unidentified worker for four days as part of a conspiracy theory as part of a conspiracy theory to find evidence to support a bogus conspiracy theory that widespread voter fraud continues in Harris County, Texas.

 

The former police, who were expelled from power 17 years ago, allegedly paid $ 266,400 by the leading Republican power broker Hotze to conduct the investigation through the Liberty Center for God and County group.

 

Hotze seems to have had Aguirre’s help in at least one other effort to oust the American votes; The 63-year-old talks about an arrest warrant used in a case that wanted to stop voting early.

 

As the CEO of the group and a talk radio host, Hotze has a long history of pushing a far-right agenda in Texas.

 

In September, the megadonor filed a lawsuit with the Texas Supreme Court to shorten the early voting time in Harris County and to limit voting places.

 

Vote extensions were implemented in the state’s largest Democratic district to ensure voters could safely use their ballot box during the pandemic.

 

The Texas Tribune made a statement saying that in this ultimately unsuccessful case, Aguirre was involved in an investigation into ‘a sweeping and fraudulent ballot-collecting scheme’.

 

Hotze made headlines in July when the Texas Tribune received a voicemail to Texas Governor Greg Abbott to ‘shoot to kill the son of a b ** ches’ protesting Floyd’s death and demanding racial justice.

 

“I want you to give a message to the governor,” Hotze said in a June message from Abbott’s Chief of Staff, Luis Saenz.

 

“I want to make sure the National Guard is here, and I want to make sure that if any of these rogue people start to riot as in Dallas, they get an order to shoot to kill if they start to ruin things. Kill ab ** ches’ son.

 

This is the only way to bring order back. Kill them. Thank you.’

 

Hotze was also a fierce rival of gay marriage and a staunch supporter of the controversial ‘bathroom design’ aimed at preventing transgender people from using bathrooms compatible with their gender identity.

 

It ran television commercials and automatic calls to support the bill, but it failed.

 

Hotze was not the first to push anti-LGBT sentiment, and in 2016 the right-wing PAC Conservative Republicans were identified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

 

More recently, Hotze filed several lawsuits against the state of Texas, battling administrative orders to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

 

In April, he sued Abbott over his decision to stay at home, and the following month sued the governor to revoke his authority to enforce administrative orders.

 

He later filed a lawsuit over the state’s mask authorization and contact tracking program.

 

In October, Hotze was one of the key members of a Republican group that tried and failed to sue for 127,000 early votes at dropped car voting stations in Harris County.

 

Hotze’s spokesperson and lawyer, Jared Woodfill, told the Texas Tribune this week that Hotze was not directly involved in Aguirre’s investigation, leading to an allegation that the 63-year-old had attacked an ‘innocent’ air fraud technician.

 

Hotze said he did not ‘direct or direct’ any of the investigations at the Freedom Center.

 

However, Woodfill confirmed that the group has hired a company led by Aguirre to investigate voter fraud on a contract with about 20 private investigators to try to find evidence in Harris County and other parts of Texas.

 

He also acknowledged that Hotze had sent tips and information to his team for their investigation.

 

“The Freedom Center has recruited an investigation team that looked into the allegations,” he said.

 

According to the pay documents, Aguirre was conducting surveillance on the technician in mid-October and theorized that the blue-collar worker was the mastermind of a giant scam operation in Harris County.

 

On October 19, after spending four days with two other inspectors, Aguirre was allegedly following the technician in his SUV before he deliberately crashed into the back of his truck, believing that he had been filled with 750,000 fake ballot papers.

After the collision, the man got out of the truck to speak with Aguirre, who then  pulled out a gun.

The former police captain pointed the gun at the technician’s head before he forced him to the ground and called cops to the scene.

Aguirre told responding officers he was a member of the Liberty Center.

Cops searched the technician’s truck and discovered no fraudulent ballots. The vehicle was instead filled with air condition parts and tools.

One of the Aguirre’s alleged accomplices is accused of stealing the technician’s truck before abandoning it a few blocks away.

Prosecutors say the victim was ‘an innocent and ordinary air conditioner repairman.’

At the time, Aguirre did not tell police he had allegedly been paid $266,400 by the Liberty Center.

He later admitted he and other investigators had set up a ‘command post’ at a Marriott hotel in Pearland.

Days before the October 19 incident, Aguirre had also called
Lt. Wayne Rubio at the Texas attorney general’s office, asking him to help with the investigation into fraudulent ballots, the Tribune reported.

Rubio declined and reported the call to police but Aguirre allegedly called back days later to say he had been in a car accident with someone he suspected of voter fraud.

On Tuesday, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg released a statement regarding Aguirre’s charges, saying: ‘His alleged investigation was backward from the start – first alleging a crime had occurred and then trying to prove it happened.

‘He crossed the line from dirty politics to commission of a violent crime, and we are lucky no one was killed.’

Aguirre’s attorney, Terry Yates, has disputed the charge, calling it a ‘political prosecution.’

He denies Aguirre deliberately ran into the technician’s truck.

‘He [Aguirre] was working and investigating voter fraud, and there was an accident. A member of the car got out and rushed at him and that’s where the confrontation took place. It’s very different from what they’re citing in the affidavit,’ Yates claimed.

Aguirre has not commented on his connections with The Liberty Center For God and Country.

The Liberty Center describes it as an organization that ‘promotes and protects our God-given, unalienable Constitutional rights and liberties through publications, conferences and events’.

It began investigating voter fraud in the run-up to the presidential election.

In the days following the election, the group published a ‘post election prayer’ which stated in part: ‘In the powerful name of Jesus, I declare the following, that every lying tongue would be silenced in the battleground states of Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Georgia, North Carolina, Arizona, and Nevada.

‘That those who devised and carried out wicked election fraud schemes intended to invalidate and nullify the expressed will of the voters would be exposed and charged with voter fraud.’

Aguirre is currently being held in prison on a $30,000 bond. If convicted, he faces up to 20 years behind bars.

According to KTRK, he was fired from the Houston Police Department in 2003 after a botched raid at a Houston Kmart parking lot in which nearly 300 people were arrested in a crackdown on illegal street racing.

Most of those who were arrested were not linked to street racing and the charges were dropped.

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