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Who is Judy Mikovits Wiki, Biography, Age, Net Worth, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook & More Facts

Judy Mikovits Wiki

Judy Mikovits Wiki – Judy Mikovits Biography

Judy Mikovits was best known for her research into chronic fatigue syndrome before she appeared in a viral and controversial online video for a film that criticizes the government’s handling of viruses.

Judy Mikovits Viral Video

Now the video in which Mikovits appeared in May 2020 has been scrubbed from prominent social media platforms, and she finds herself under renewed scrutiny. The controversy is nothing new to Mikovits, however; she’s been the focal point of it since 2011 when a prominent research study into chronic fatigue syndrome – for which she was a co-author – crumbled in high-profile fashion.

The video – a promotional teaser for a California production company’s movie called Pandemic – argues that the U.S. government’s strategy toward infectious disease, from HIV/AIDs to COVID-19 – is flawed by greed and misinformation. Heavy has conducted an extensive fact-checking of various claims made in the Mikovits’ Pandemic video. You can read it here. The video can be found here.
Read about the man who created the movie here. Mikovits, who has a new book out, discusses her arrest and jailing in the video and raises unproven accusations against Dr. Tony Fauci. She was working for the Whittemore Peterson Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease, which is located in Reno, Nevada, when the chronic fatigue syndrome controversies broke out, although they terminated her. Mikovits’ beef against Fauci dates back to the early 1980s and who deserved credit for identifying the virus that causes AIDS. However, her later career focused on chronic fatigue syndrome, not HIV.
Heavy also reached out to Fauci for the response to the video through his agency. Amanda Fine, chief of the news media branch for the National Institutes of Health, responded with this statement: “The National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases are focused on critical research aimed at ending the COVID-19 pandemic and preventing further deaths. We are not engaging in tactics by some seeking to derail our efforts.”
But what of Mikovits and her chronic fatigue syndrome research, which the movie touts as a “blockbuster”?
A 2009 article in the Reno Gazette-Journal describes how Mikovits’ grandfather was diagnosed with lung cancer when she was 12. Her parents were divorced, so she and her twin sister lived with their grandparents. This experience, watching her grandfather struggle with cancer, created a life-long interest in science.

Family, Parents

A 2009 article in the Reno Gazette-Journal describes how Mikovits’ grandfather was diagnosed with lung cancer when she was 12. Her parents were divorced, so she and her twin sister lived with their grandparents. This experience, watching her grandfather struggle with cancer, created a life-long interest in science.

Investigations

Mikovits’ claims of persecution revolve around the story of her brief arrest and jailing. However, the truth is more complex than the picture of that incident in the video.
Gladstone Observer reports that Mikovits was the subject of an “internet myth” dating to 2018 that she was “thrown in prison for research that led to the discovery that deadly retroviruses have been transmitted to 25 million Americans through human vaccines.” The Pandemic video resurrects elements of this claim, painting her arrest as unfair retribution.
The eventually dismissed criminal case against Mikovits received fairly extensive news coverage at the time. According to Science magazine, in November 2011, the district attorney in Washoe County, Nevada, filed a criminal complaint against Mikovits that “charged the virologist with illegally taking computer data and related property from her former employer, the Whittemore Peterson Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease (WPI) in Reno, Nevada.” (Heavy has reached out to the Whittemore Peterson Institute for comment on Mikovits.)
The Chicago Tribune reported that the “University of Nevada, Reno police issued an arrest warrant listing two felony charges: possession of the stolen property and unlawful taking of computer data, equipment, supplies, or other computer-related property.”

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