Home / Breaking News / Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh (The Beatles) Biography, Wiki, Age, Family, Fast Facts You Need to Know
Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh (The Beatles) Biography, Wiki, Age, Family, Fast Facts You Need to Know

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh Bio

Two British ISIS terrorists Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh who were the best known as “The Beatles” accused of killing American hostages are being transferred to U.S. military custody due to impending Turkish invasion into Syria threatening their continued detention by Kurdish forces.

Alexanda Kotey Biography

Alexanda Amon Kotey known as Jihadi Ringo, is a former British citizen who was captured by the Syrian Democratic Forces, who said he was fleeing from the collapse of Daesh, the short-lived “Islamic State”. He has been designated a terrorist by the United States and identified in the press as one of the four Jihadi Beatles who took part in Daesh atrocities. Kotey has denied being a member of “the Beatles” but admits joining the Daesh terrorist group.

Alexanda Amon Kotey Age

He is 36 years old.

Alexanda Kotey Early life

Born in Britain to a Ghanaian father and Greek Cypriot mother, Kotey spent his youth in Shepherd’s Bush. The Daily Telegraph reports he is a supporter of Queens Park Rangers F.C. and dreamed of joining the team when he grew up. His Syrian captors say Kotey worked as a drug dealer in London prior to his radicalisation. He is believed to have converted to Islam in his early twenties and left two young children in Britain.

Alexanda Kotey Time in Daesh

In 2014 and 2015 Daesh held dozens of European and North American captives, and the brutal conditions of their detention were widely reported. Four English-speaking Daesh fighters played a central role in the brutality. Their identities were initially either not known, or security officials did not make their identities known to the public, so the press dubbed the four as the Jihadi Beatles, with the most well-known being known as Jihadi John. Later Kotey was reported to have been one of the other three Beatles.

On 10 January 2017, the United States Department of State formally designated Kotey as a terrorist under the authority of Executive Order 13224. This designation prohibited American citizens, financial institutions, and other American corporations, from having any financial dealings with him.

The US claims that Kotey was involved in beheadings and known for administering “exceptionally cruel torture methods”, including “electronic shocks”. The 34-year-old is also accused of acting as an Isis recruiter and being responsible for drawing several other British extremists to join Isis. Kotey has denied being a member of “the Beatles”, but admits joining the Daesh terrorist group.

Daesh controlled areas of Syria and Iraq underwent a steady erosion in 2015, 2016 and 2017, with their remaining enclaves collapsing in late 2017 and early 2018. Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, a friend from London, who was also reported to have been one of the Jihadi Beatles, were captured trying to flee the region, on 24 January 2018.

El Shafee Elsheikh Biography

El Shafee Elsheikh known as Jihadi George, is a Sudanese-born British captive of the Syrian Democratic Forces, who said he was fleeing from the collapse of Daesh, the short-lived “Islamic State”. He has been designated a terrorist by the United States and identified in the press as one of the four Jihadi Beatles who took part in Daesh atrocities. Elsheikh has denied being a member of “the Beatles” but admits joining the Daesh terrorist group.

El Shafee Elsheikh Age

He is 31 years old.

El Shafee Elsheikh Early life

Born in Sudan, Elsheikh spent his youth in London, England. The Daily Telegraph reports he was a follower of a local football team, Queen’s Park Rangers, and dreamed of joining the team when he grew up.

El Shafee Elsheikh Allegations of ties to terrorism

In 2014 and 2015, Daesh held dozens of European and North American captives, and the brutal conditions of their detention was widely reported. Four English-speaking Daesh fighters played a central role in the brutality. Their identities were initially either not known or security officials did not make their identities known to the public, so the press dubbed the four as The Beatles, with Mohammed Emwazi, the most well-known being known of the group, having been dubbed Jihadi John. Later, Elsheikh was reported to have been one of the other three Beatles.

On March 30, 2017, Elsheikh and four other men were named as suspected terrorists, by the US State Department, under Executive Order 13224. This Executive Order signed by President George W. Bush, shortly after al Qaeda’s attacks on September 11, 2001, allowed the State Department to bar US citizens, US financial institutions, and other US corporations, from having any financial transactions with designated individuals.

Syrian Democratic Forces captured Elsheikh, and his friend Alexanda Kotey, on January 24, 2018. The pair were reported to have been trying to blend in with genuine civilian refugees, fleeing the collapse of the last Daesh enclaves.

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh The Beatles

The Washington Post reports that Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, two of the four British ISIS soldiers known as the ‘Beatles’, were being held by the Kurds with the goal of making the stand trial in the U.S.

However, since President Trump decided to pull American troops out of Northern Syria there are fears the men would escape from Syrian jail after a Turkish invasion.

A senior official tells The Washington Post that those men have been taken to Iraq, while another called them ‘high-valued detainees’ and could not disclose where they were being taken.

Fast Facts You Need to Know

  • Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh are being transferred to U.S. custody 
  • The men are two of four British ISIS terrorists known as the ‘Beatles’ 
  • They were being held by the Kurds with the objective of making them stand trial in the U.S.
  • Since Trump decided to pull American troops out of Northern Syria, there are fears the men would escape from Syrian jail after a Turkish invasion
  • Prosecutors would seek to charge the two men as ‘conspirators in hostage-taking resulting in death,’ which carries a potential death sentence 
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